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Posts Tagged ‘mastectomy’


My cousin’s favorite holiday is Thanksgiving, and we shared the holiday with her and her husband for many years. This year, she was in the midst of packing to move and I wasn’t travelling, so we endeavored to have Thanksgiving at our house, even though I wouldn’t be able to assist in preparations. Our family, cousins and sister’s family chipped in on the cooking and cleanup to make a beautiful Thanksgiving feast. And to my utter delight, I was able to take my first bites of food beginning that week. Thanksgiving was particularly poignant as we all were so grateful for my survival and beginning recovery. Recovery began and proceeded, marked by small advances through December and January. One drain out; then another. First shower. First food after months of IV feeding. Weight gain (I had lost 15 lbs.) Walking further. Driving. Pain lessening. I scheduled the prophylactic mastectomy for June, sure I would be well enough to have the next surgery in seven months.

To be continued . . . . . .

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My last blog entry was on September 7, 2014. If you follow my blog, you might think I fell off the face of the earth. As a matter of fact, I almost did – permanently. But by some miracle, I still roam the earth, though the past year has not been without it’s challenges.

Background:

In early summer 2014, I learned from a family member that my father’s line carried a defective BFCA1 gene. My cousin spent the previous year dealing with breast cancer, a BRCA1 gene mutation, followed by a hysterectomy, a mastectomy and reconstructive surgery. Now, she urged all her cousins to be tested for this gene, which has a 50% chance of being inherited from a carrier.

Having this gene defect raises a female’s risk of breast cancer to at least 65% (compared to 12% in the general population) and to 40% for ovarian cancer (compared to 1.3% in the general population). There is also an increased risk for fallopian tube and peritoneal cancer. Men with the gene defect have a moderately increased risk of breast cancer and increased risk of prostate cancer. Both men and women have an increased risk of pancreatic cancer.

I met with a genetic counselor, who evaluated my risk and determined whether I should be tested. Family history revealed many cases of breast and/or ovarian cancers among my father’s first cousins. Also, because two of my first cousins tested positive, I was advised to be tested. No hesitation there.

My results came back positive. Rather than being devastated, I was already mentally prepared to move forward with preventive surgeries, if I had the gene defect. I am a take-charge kind of person, impatient, and unwilling to wait around for disaster to strike, if I can do something to prevent it.

I quickly got recommendations for the best surgeons in my area. They recommended preventive surgery and I was fully on board. I chose to first undergo a full hysterectomy, since ovarian cancer is often not detected until it is more advanced. The minimally invasive, robotically assisted, laparoscopic surgery was scheduled for September 9th. That would give me 4 weeks (more than enough time) to heal and leave for my 3-week trip to France with my husband.

To be continued . . . . . . . . .

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